Pavlov’s House

It’s not too often that I sing the praises of a print and play (PnP) games but only a few come to mind that are truly worth the investment of time and effort to get everything printed, cut, pasted, sleeved and assembled. One I want to talk about in this post is Pavlov’s House which is the second big PnP game that I have assembled from designer David Thompson. (The first was Castle Itter pictured below.)

Castle Itter somewhere mid-game.

David made Pavlov’s House available to gamers to try out and to play test. Additionally, it is available to play for free on Tabletopia. I personally dislike playing board games online as the whole reason for me to play is to disconnect. The moment I played it, I knew this game was going to get picked up by a publisher. In fact it was recently funded on Kickstarter by DVG and should be hitting shelves later this year! The game is sort of a tower defense game. As enemies encroach on your position, you can counter attack to select areas on the board but only from specified firing positions. And as the fight for Stalingrad continues on, the enemy slowly makes their was up the Volga in their attempt to take the city. So not only are you defending on a more strategic level but also on a smaller scale tactical level defending the house as well.

Pavlov’s House all setup and ready to play.

Balance-wise the game may have been a tad off as I was playing version .5 rules with a few cards missing since I had printed a previous iteration of cards. I will get the entire game up to version 0.5 at some point in the near future.

Here are the three areas of the board:

Pavlov’s House

Most of my combat positions in the House are occupied but I will admit that I did not suppress as much as I should have, but the dice were pretty good to me. I also made the mistake of deploying my Soviet Command counters too late in the game and thus not getting four actions early enough. Three actions every turn just isn’t enough to get things done. The red discs represent disrupted units and the grayed out counter is exhausted. Although you can’t see it, off the map, there are a bunch of “dead dudes” — didn’t get enough first aid counters into the reserves fast enough either. Always too little, too late. This part of the game feels very much like Castle Itter. You are using your counters and weapons to roll dice to hit armored counters and infantry counters in the middle of the board…

The area surrounding Pavlov’s House and the tracks of approaching enemies.

…that shows the tracks that advance toward the house. Here’s some infantry spread out and a couple of armored divisions. The Panzer IV in the game is tough by the way! The Sapper token on Track 4 saved me from advancing Scouts thanks to a successful roll. Not sure if the Sapper token is supposed to be removed on a successful roll or not. I house ruled it and left it in, to make my life easier. I suspect it should’ve come out.

Both these areas make the game feel very much like Castle Itter as I said. Plus the infantry Wehrmacht counters are identical. So while you are trying to manage that, you are also trying to manage a strategic situation on the far right side of the board…

A high level representation of Stalingrad and the surrounding area.

…that depicts the Volga and the area around Stalingrad (space #18). As you can see, a Luftwaffe 4 bombing roll of 14 would’ve placed a disrupted token on space #17 since 14, 15 and 16 were already disrupted — just one away. Very, very close as the bombing of Stalingrad ends the game. The Staging Area with all the cubes represent a supply line across the Volga where you can get more ammo (that are traded for suppression markers), first aid, Sappers and food into Pavlov’s House. Can you believe it? I have to feed my Soviets or they die!

So overall…

The art on this game is very well done. Everything is functional, clean, and easy to read.

The rules are very well written and provide clear examples of game play. Only a couple of times did I think there was some vagueness and had to house rule it on the fly. No big deal as this was my first play and I haven’t delved into the forums or asked David directly. I really dig how the Soviet cards have two different actions on them but you can only choose one. Plus you draw four cards, but can only use three and the Fog of War cards are dummy cards that clog up your card draws. Really tough decisions. I wish the cards had some reminder text/bullet points on them so I wouldn’t have to refer to the player aid constantly to remind myself what each action can do. The Wehrmacht cards are almost identical to most of the SS cards in Castle Itter. So that was easy to figure out and understand. I only got a little confused with the Assault card but over repeated times that card appeared, that became easier.

As I said earlier, not having enough actions really sucks. Big time! But that’s the game — trying to best use what few actions you have the best way possible.

Yes, the randomness is pretty high in this game. The card flips can kill you especially if that one track is almost full and you pull another Infantry or Armored card. Better suppress that baddie or you’re screwed! Plus, a lot of dice rolls. It seems less than Castle Itter but I am not sure. I think the dice rolls are pretty common for most wargames actually, so that really doesn’t bother me.

The win conditions are pretty tough and the game is a little long the first time. I imagine over repeated plays, it would become far easier as one becomes more familiar with the cards, the rules and the special abilities of some of the Soviet counters which is really easy to overlook.

I think this game is great! I am excited that it has been funded on Kickstarter, I backed it and look forward to its arrival some time in the summer. The game is available on Tabletopia if you’d like to play it. If you are more of a tactile guy, like me, the PnP files for version 0.5 are available for free on BGG. There’s a lot of cards, but after that making the counters is pretty easy. You do need 5 dice and a bunch of tokens but that’s really not a big deal. David Thompson has designed a really great game about the drama around Pavlov’s House and the bombing of Stalingrad. I am looking forward to playing this again soon. One more thing that is really cool, in David’s games he includes a section at the back of the rulebook of readings and references for players who wish to learn more about the conflict!

It’s definitely a solid design.

Please follow, like us, and share the love:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *